Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Trekking Guide in South America

South America's most famous trek is the Inca Trail to Machu Picchu, now heavily regulated with limited numbers of permits due to its enduring popularity - and it is a stunningly beautiful as well as challenging four day trek, albeit one that attracts many people along its route with numbers now being strictly limited each day.

For those who love to lace up their boots and grab a rucksack but want a more remote location, there are some absolutely breath-taking walks all over South & Central America worth considering. Peru trekking holidays can offer treks to Inca sites such as Choquequirao as well as other civilisations such as Kuelap or the stunning remote traditional communities of the Apu Ausangate. I will happily advise on some great alternatives for keen walkers, being a fan myself of using my own two feet to explore and slow down the pace a little. And of course if you prefer a little more comfort, I can recommend some beautiful mountain lodge to lodge treks along quieter and alternative routes to Machu Picchu such as the Lares or Salkantay trails.

Chapada Diamantina National Park, west of Brazil's Salvador de Bahia is a truly awe-inspiring landscape ideal for trekking with its verdant table-top mountains, waterfalls, underground lakes, and caves. What about combining a visit to the Glaciers National Park in the stunning rugged wilderness of southern Patagonia with a few days spent in El Chalten where your hiking guide will take you walking past remote glacial valleys towards Mt Fitzroy or spend time across the border in Chile trekking the W circuit around Torres del Paine National Park. You could also combine your trekking adventure in this region with a chance to track one of South America's most elusive wild cats, the puma.

Heading further north into Ecuador brings you to the stunning peaks of the 'Avenue of the Volcanoes', where we can suggest a beautiful new trekking programme where you can take on some of this small country's more challenging peaks as well as experiencing stays in delightful small, locally run haciendas and lodges, perhaps combined with a more relaxed journey aboard the newly re-opened train line between Quito and Guayaquil on the coast. If you like the thought of combining iconic rail journeys with using your own two feet, then you could also venture northwards again to Mexico. After journeying by train through the Copper Canyon, get off and take to pathways deep into the canyon to remote settlements of native Tarahumara Indians.

The list goes on and on. It's important not only be able to discover a great list of active adventures, but also ensure the little details of your journey all go to plan.

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